fbpx

Boeing vs Airbus: How The Market Stands Today

Venerable 105-year-old The Boeing Company has been having a tough time lately due in no small part to 21-year-old Airbus SE – the culmination of various historic European aircraft manufacturers who consolidated after the Second World War and with about 25% of its stock held by the governments of France, Germany and Spain. The latter surpassed the former as the world’s largest planemaker by the end of 2019 and is intent on maintaining its lead.

In order to analyze the value propositions inherent, lets break down the scenario on market type: civilian versus military.

Civilian Market

By the end of 2021, Reuters reported that while Airbus had delivered more aircraft than Boeing, the latter had recovered by the end of 2021 in terms of gross orders.

In terms of net orders (gross orders minus cancellations or conversions), Boeing remains a little behind. This metric improves after Boeing adjusts the net orders as per ASC 606 (an accounting mechanism that filters out past orders of aircraft deemed unlikely to be delivered, due to the financial condition of the buyers).

Boeing’s highest production capability remains the problematic 737 – which is also its largest backlog as of end of 2021.

Source: Boeing

Meanwhile, as of end of February, Airbus’ reports on its net total in terms of orders and deliveries indicate prevailing strength.

Source: Airbus

2021 witnessed a massive increase in Airbus’ orders, a slight increase in deliveries and a slight decrease in backlog when compared to 2020. This indicates that the European manufacturer has gone from strength to strength during the pandemic.

Source: Airbus

However, both titans have new rivals that are steadily building competing product offerings. Over the past couple of years, the Commercial Aircraft Corporation of China (COMAC) – a corporation owned predominantly by the Chinese government – has been working on the C919 which, as of late 2021, has been reported to be ready to commence deliveries later this year, with China Eastern Airlines being its launch customer.

Like most commercial aircraft manufacturers, COMAC is heavily dependent on Western suppliers. It has been reported that up to

60% of its parts come from the likes of Honeywell and General Electric.

Another competitor has been the PJSC United Aircraft Corporation (or « Obyedinyonnaya Aviastroitelnaya Korporatsiya » in its native Russian with the Moscow Stock Exchange ticker UNAC) which is predominantly a conglomerate comprising of the Soviet-era Ilyushin, Irkut, Mikoyan, Sukhoi, Tupolev and Yakovlev design bureaus with a majority stake held by the Russian government. UNAC’s Irkut MC-21 (which is largely similar to the C919 except in the engines) was also expected to take flight this year.

Like the C919, the MC-21 is also dependent on Western suppliers such as Raytheon’s Collins Aerospace and Honeywell. As Russia’s « special military action » in Ukraine continues, most of these suppliers have complied with sanctions and are pulling out of assisting in development of UNAC’s civilian aircraft initiative. This is expected to create significant delays of at least a few years for a large-scale rollout of the MC-21. In June 2016, both UNAC and COMAC initiated a joint venture company named the « China-Russia Aircraft International Co, Ltd. » (CRAIC) in Shanghai with the intention of producing long-range 250- to 320-seat widebody airliners by 2028. Given the problems faced by Russian companies, it’s likely that this timeline will suffer as well.

Military Market

The military market is much more complicated. After the Cold War ended and the Soviet Union dissolved, the military aircraft market is now open to competition from all quarters as opposed to being limited within geopolitical silos. Russian arms manufacturers have found markets in over 45 countries as of 2020.

It’s largest military market, by far, was the Republic of India which has the world’s 2nd largest military and is the 3rd largest military spender. At the time of the Soviet Union’s breakup, over 70% of the country’s army armaments, 80% of its aviation systems and 85% of its naval platforms were of Soviet origin. However, over this past decade, Russia’s share of Indian arms imports fell from 70% in 2012-17 to 46% in 2017-21.

This has primarily been of benefit to manufacturers in France, Israel and the U.S. Boeing benefited enormously too: of the various military products made by the company, the Indian military operates the world’s 2nd largest fleet of P8I submarine hunters after the U.S., 22 Apache helicopter gunships built with India-specific requirements, several Chinook transport helicopters as well as C-17 Globemaster III heavy transport aircraft. But the outlook for future orders looks cloudy on account of an increasing push on foreign manufacturers to either set up base in India by themselves to produce a substantial proportion of the systems being purchased or initiate joint ventures with Indian companies with Indian employees and facilities.

Most of Boeing’s purchased were made under the previous military imports regulations which required an « offset », i.e ,for every weapon system being introduced via a foreign manufacturer, said manufacturer must set up a certain number of localized production-related facilities in India and must select a certain number of system or sub-system suppliers from among India’s high-tech enterprises. However, a key component of U.S. government policy is the leveraging of arms exports to maintain its industrial base and — through economies of scale — reduce costs to the U.S. armed forces. Thus, Boeing has been unable to comply with offsets under the previous law and faces difficulties in maintaining sizeable production work under the current law.

In contrast, Airbus has registered significant success recently: in a deal agreed upon in September 2021, the company secured the sale of 56 C-295 tactical transporters to the Indian military. After a outright import of 16 aircraft in fully-prepared condition, the company will be developing an entire industrial ecosystem – from manufacture, assembly, testing and qualification, to delivery and maintenance over the aircraft’s lifecycle – in a joint venture with its partner Tata Advanced Systems Limited (TASL). The company undoubtedly hopes to leverage this new industrial base to drive future sales of other aircraft and thus deepen market penetration.

In previous years, after a deal for 126 Rafale fighter jets by French company Dassault Aviation was watered down to 36 in « fly-away » condition by the Indian government, the French government – also a key stakeholder in Airbus – pitched a proposal to set up a completely indigenous production facility for manufacturing Rafales if the deal size was pushed up to 100. Additionally, French engine manufacturer Safran offered to modernise and co-develop the indigenous Kaveri engine. After 30 years of intensive work which resulted in nine full prototype engines, four core engines and strong capabilities developed in many critical technology domains, this engine was passed over to meet the changing requirements of the Indian Light Combat Aircraft program – which opted for General Electric engines instead. The French government guaranteed that Safran’s proposal will ensure the republic’s complete ‘sovereignty’ in aero-engine technology. Given how seriously both the Indian government and its billion-plus citizens take the notion of sovereignty, this is a very canny offer and, unsurprisingly, is in the final stages of discussion.

These sorts of innovative decision-making by European players (as well as Israeli companies) indicate why the likes of Boeing and UNAC are finding making inroads into this massive market so challenging. The latter, particularly, has floundered in effectively meeting the Indian government’s stringent requirements in areas such as quality, efficiency and timely delivery when it comes to new orders of next-generation aircraft (as opposed to upgrades and spares for Soviet-era acquisitions).

An order placed with Boeing to acquire six additional P8I aircraft in 2019 was cancelled earlier this year in favour of an indigenous platform based on locally-produced Airbus C-295.

The military market is a very complex place, thus making it difficult to take a call on which company will perform best in weapons sales all over the world. In India’s case, however, Airbus is increasingly stronger in terms of positioning over both Boeing and UNAC.

Ratios and Trends

With regard to fiscals, while the strong net cash position shown in a previous article might suggest that Boeing is in a strong position, this was more due to the fact that the reduction in orders on account of problems with the 737 Max had lowered expenses. This supposition is validated by the Price-to-Earnings (PE) Ratios seen for Boeing making it on par with UNAC. While Boeing’s Price-to-Sales (PS) Ratios led over Airbus for a while, both companies’ PS Ratios are now beginning to draw par. UNAC is a laggard in this metric.

Debt is not a huge concern given the sheer size of these companies. Nonetheless, in this metric, UNAC leads the pack, with Boeing being next (which is predominantly long-term debt). Airbus has also recently been packing on long-term debt as well (which now constitutes around 89% of its total debt).

Source: Bloomberg

Note: Data services don’t report ratios if they’re deemed meaningless. When earnings go negative, PE Ratios estimated go negative. Given that stock price is always positive, this is considered « meaningless ».

In the time horizons created between the dates shown above, the stock performance has been quite interesting. UNAC’s stock price had been and remains absurdly low – thus aiding in creating solid average daily traded volumes (in units of shares). Airbus is the least-traded in comparison.

Boeing’s stock performance has shown extremely high variance. This is unsurprising; as highlighted in a previous article regarding the constituents of the S&P 500, the U.S. equity market is the most overvalued in the world. Overvaluation leads to volatility. Airbus comes second here, with UNAC running relatively flat across all the windows.

Between Boeing and Airbus, there is very strong similarity in the extent of variability of stock prices within each horizon, as demonstrated by the coefficient of variation. UNAC has a fairly similar trend as well until Russia’s recent actions in Ukraine pushed up both this metric as well as daily volumes.

Source: Bloomberg

In Conclusion

The mercurial nature of the global military market means that Boeing will likely have to predominantly rely on its domestic legacy business in the U.S. The trend seen in U.S. military aircraft shipments, which started rising after 2001 after a decade of decline, have been downwards since 2010.

Source: Bloomberg

While new orders and shipments have been keeping pace with each other over the past several years, the net value of unfilled orders in the U.S. market continue to balloon upwards.

Source: Bloomberg

The sheer size of « Unfilled Orders » needs some context: while new systems are constantly proposed and even approved, the long timelines for system development vis-à-vis changes in strategic needs and changing technologies means that a large proportion of these orders (by value) will be in limbo until they’re replaced by other orders – after which the cycle repeats. This is, by no means, unique to the U.S.; other nations’ spending show similar trends. However, none are quite as massive as in the U.S. This is an additional factor that highlights the complexity of the military market.

Like UNAC, Boeing has a massive legacy business by virtue of its longevity. Unlike UNAC, it has an element of diversification by virtue of the vast fleets of commercial aircraft already sold, which will inevitably lead to at least some repeat business. The latest development – a China Eastern Airlines Boeing 737-800 taking a near-vertical fall into the Guangxi Hills in southern China – will likely raise many questions of the company’s technical competency, which will possibly get more murky in the upcoming months of investigation and will likely have some impact on the company’s stock performance in the near term.

In the current day, Boeing and Airbus are effectively a duopoly in the civilian market, which is quite meaningful in terms of business. Over the mid- to long-term (i.e. around 5-10 years), an investor shouldn’t be surprised if new rivals emerge: be it COMAC, UNAC or even an Indian company or conglomerate that suddenly announces an entry into this space. Until then, while both companies are viable mid- to long-term investments, Airbus is slightly better positioned than Boeing in terms of nimbleness, market prospects, and perceived technical competence. What this picture will look like in a year’s time is, of course, another matter.

Articles Similaires

A quick study on the effects of market behaviour on the returns of a 3X ETP vs a 2X ETP.
A quick study on the effects of market behaviour on the returns of a 3X ETP vs a 2X ETP.

Chercher

Search
Generic filters
Exact matches only
Search in title
Search in content
Search in excerpt
Filter by Categories
Education FR
ETPs
Featured FR
In the press FR
Insight FR
Market Insights FR
Research FR
Uncategorized
WebsimFR
Search
Generic filters
Exact matches only
Search in title
Search in content
Search in excerpt
Filter by Categories
Education FR
ETPs
Featured FR
In the press FR
Insight FR
Market Insights FR
Research FR
Uncategorized
WebsimFR

Violeta Todorova

Senior Research

Violeta a rejoint Leverage Shares en septembre 2022. Elle est chargée de mener des analyses techniques et des recherches sur les actions et macroéconomiques, fournissant des informations importantes pour aider à façonner les stratégies d’investissement des clients.

Avant de rejoindre LS, Violeta a travaillé dans plusieurs sociétés d’investissement de premier plan en Australie, telles que Tollhurst et Morgans Financial, où elle a passé les 12 dernières années de sa carrière.

Violeta est une technicienne de marché certifiée de l’Australian Technical Analysts Association et est titulaire d’un diplôme d’études supérieures en finance appliquée et investissement de Kaplan Professional (FINSIA), Australie, où elle a été conférencière pendant plusieurs années.

Julian Manoilov

Analyste senior

Julian a étudié l’économie, la psychologie, la sociologie, la politique européenne et la linguistique. Il possède de l’expérience en matière de développement commercial et de marketing grâce à des entreprises qu’il a lui-même créées.

Pour Julian, Leverage Shares est une entreprise innovante dans le domaine de la finance et de la fintech, et il se réjouit toujours de partager les prochaines grandes avancées avec les investisseurs du Royaume-Uni et d’Europe.

Oktay Kavrak

Directeur

Oktay a rejoint Leverage Shares fin 2019. Il est responsable de la croissance de l’activité à travers des relations clés et le développement de l’activité commerciale sur les marchés anglophones. 

Il a rejoint LS après UniCredit, où il était responsable des relations avec les entreprises pour les multinationales. Il a également travaillé au sein de sociétés telles qu’IBM Bulgarie et DeGiro / FundShare dans le domaine de la finance d’entreprise et de l’administration de fonds.

Oktay est titulaire d’une licence en finance et comptabilité et d’un certificat d’études supérieures en entrepreneuriat du Babson College. Il est également détenteur de la certification CFA.

Sandeep Rao

Recherche

Sandeep a une longue expérience des marchés financiers. Il a débuté sa carrière en tant qu’ingénieur financier au sein d’un hedge fund basé à Chicago. Pendant huit ans, il a travaillé dans différents domaines et organisations, de la division Prime Services de Barclays Capital à l’équipe de recherche sur les indices du Nasdaq (plus récemment).

Sandeep est titulaire d’un master spécialisé en finance et d’un master en administration des affaires de I’Institut de technologie de Chicago.

Welcome to Leverage Shares

Conditions Générales Notice Si vous n’êtes pas considérés comme un investisseur institutionnel, vous serez donc classés comme investisseur particulier. Pour le moment, nous ne pouvons pas envoyer de communications directement aux investisseurs particuliers. Vous êtes invités à consulter le contenu de ce site web et à enregistrer vos coordonnées afin que nous puissions vous contacter dans l’avenir, mais nous ne vous enverrons aucun document directement. Si vous considérés comme un « Investisseur institutionnel », vous affirmez soit que vous êtes effectivement un client professionnel, soit que vous souhaitez être traité comme un client professionnel tel que défini dans la directive sur les marchés d’instruments financiers, ou un équivalent dans une juridiction extérieure à l’Espace économique européen. Ce site web est géré par Leverage Shares Management Company, qui est une société à responsabilité limitée et est constituée en Irlande avec des sièges sociaux au 2 Grand Canal Square, Grand Canal Harbour, Dublin 2. Le contenu de ce site Web a été approuvé en vertu de la S21 de la Financial Services and Markets Act 2000 par Resolution Compliance Limited. Resolution Compliance Limited est autorisée et réglementée par la Financial Conduct Authority (FRN 574048). Ce site web est fourni à titre informatif uniquement et ne constitue pas un conseil en investissement ou une offre de vente ou une sollicitation d’achat ou d’investissement. Rien sur ce site web ne constitue un conseil sur le bien-fondé d’un produit ou d’un investissement, rien ne constitue un conseil d’investissement, juridique, fiscal ou tout autre conseil, ni ne doit être utilisé pour prendre une décision d’investissement. Les investisseurs potentiels doivent obtenir des conseils en investissement indépendants et s’informer des exigences légales applicables, des réglementations de contrôle des changes et des taxes dans leur juridiction. Ce site web est conforme aux exigences réglementaires du Royaume-Uni. Il peut y avoir des lois dans votre pays, lieu de résidence ou dans le pays à partir duquel vous accédez à ce site web qui restreignent la mesure dans laquelle le site web peut être mis à votre disposition. Visiteurs des États-Unis Les informations fournies sur ce site ne s’adressent à aucune personne résidante aux États-Unis, ni à aucune personne citoyenne des États-Unis, à aucun de ses États ou à aucun de ses territoires ou possessions. Personnes accédant à ce site Web dans l’Espace économique européen L’accès à ce site est limité aux non-américains. Aux personnes en dehors des États-Unis au sens du règlement S en vertu de la loi américaine Securities Act de 1933, telle que modifiée (la «Securities Act»). Chaque personne accédant à ce site, ce faisant, reconnaît que: (1) il ne s’agit pas d’une personne américaine (au sens du règlement S en vertu de la Securities Act) et est situé en dehors des États-Unis (au sens du Règlement S en vertu de la Securities Act); et (2) tous les titres décrits dans le présent document (A) n’ont pas été et ne seront pas enregistrés en vertu de la Securities Act ou auprès d’une autorité en valeurs mobilières d’un État ou d’une autre juridiction et (B) ne peuvent être offerts, vendus, mis en gage ou autrement transférés sauf aux personnes en dehors des États-Unis conformément au règlement S en vertu de la Securities Act conformément aux conditions de ces titres. Aucun des fonds figurant sur ce site Web n’est enregistré en vertu de la loi américaine sur les conseillers en investissement de 1940, telle que modifiée (la «loi sur les conseillers»). Exclusion de responsabilité Certains documents mis à disposition sur le site Internet ont été préparés et émis par des personnes autres que Leverage Shares Management Company. Cela inclut tout document de prospectus. Leverage Shares Management Company n’est en aucun cas responsable du contenu d’un tel document. Sauf dans ces cas, les informations sur le site ont été fournies de bonne foi et tous les efforts ont été faits pour en assurer l’exactitude. Néanmoins, Laverage Shares Management Company ne sera pas responsable des pertes résultant de la confiance accordée à une partie du site Web et elle garantit l’exactitude de toute information ou contenu sur le site Web. La description de tout titre ETP mentionnée dans ce site web est générale. Les termes et conditions applicables aux investisseurs seront précisés dans le Prospectus, disponible sur le site Internet et devront être lus avant tout investissement. Avertissements concernant les risques La valeur d’un investissement dans des ETP peut baisser ou augmenter et les performances passées ne sont pas un indicateur fiable des performances futures. La négociation d’ETP peut ne pas convenir à tous les types d’investisseurs car ils comportent un degré de risque élevé. Vous risquez de perdre la totalité de votre investissement initial. Ne spéculez qu’avec de l’argent que vous pouvez vous permettre de perdre. Les variations des taux de change peuvent également entraîner une augmentation ou une baisse de la valeur de votre investissement. Les lois fiscales peuvent être sujettes à changement. Veuillez vous assurer de bien comprendre les risques encourus. En cas de doute, veuillez consulter un conseiller financier indépendant. Les investisseurs doivent se reporter à la section intitulée «Facteurs de risque» du prospectus correspondant pour plus de détails sur ces risques et sur d’autres risques liés à un investissement dans les titres offerts par l’émetteur. Investir avec de l’effet de levier Les ETPs de Leverage Shares offrent un effet de levier et ne conviennent qu’aux investisseurs expérimentés connaissant les risques et les avantages potentiels des stratégies d’investissement à effet de levier. Cookies Leverage Shares Management Company peut collecter des données sur votre ordinateur, y compris votre adresse IP, votre système d’exploitation et le type de navigateur, pour l’administration du système et à d’autres fins similaires (cliquez ici pour plus d’informations). Il s’agit de données statistiques sur les actions et les habitudes de navigation des utilisateurs, et elles n’identifient aucun utilisateur individuel du site web. Ceci est réalisé par l’utilisation de cookies. Un cookie est un petit fichier de lettres et de chiffres qui est placé sur votre ordinateur si vous l’acceptez. En cliquant sur «J’accepte» ci-dessous, vous consentez à l’utilisation des cookies comme décrit ici. Ces cookies vous permettent de vous distinguer des autres utilisateurs du site web, ce qui permet à Leverage Shares Company de vous offrir une meilleure expérience lorsque vous naviguez sur le site web et permet également d’améliorer le site web de temps à autre. Veuillez noter que vous pouvez ajuster les paramètres de votre navigateur pour supprimer ou bloquer les cookies, mais vous ne pourrez peut-être pas accéder à certaines parties de notre site web sans eux. En cliquant, vous acceptez les conditions générales affichées.